Will Immunotherapy Reduce My Child’s Allergies…Is It Worth It?

Allergy shotsImmunotherapy is a series of injections that helps build the body’s immunity to substances that trigger allergy symptoms. Each shot contains a tiny amount of the offending allergen. Over time, your immune system builds up a tolerance, which means that those sniffles and watery eyes lessen or even disappear.

Since immunotherapy is a commitment — the entire course takes years — it’s recommended for people who have multiple allergies and suffer from symptoms at least three months out of the year. Speak with your pediatrician about your child. Most doctors, including myself, advise that children should be at least 5 years of age to start allergy shots.

If your child is a candidate, consider whether or not you’d be able to take him to the doctor’s office regularly. He’ll need to get shots once a week for several months, and then once a month or so for two to five more years.

Next, check in with your insurance company. Most cover immunotherapy, but some have a yearly maximum or deductible. It’s important to have a clear idea of what’s covered before you begin treatment.

The good news: 85 to 95 percent of patients experience a significant improvement in their allergy symptoms. And for most, those benefits last for life. What’s more, immunotherapy will protect your child from developing allergy-induced asthma and other types of allergies.

Has anyone in your family tried immunotherapy? Did it work?



Child Health & Safety News Roundup: 05-06-2013 to 05-12-2013

twitter thumbWelcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world.

Each day we use Twitter to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and other caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we may miss something, but we think overall we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. But for our friends and colleagues who are not on Twitter (or who are but may have missed something), we offer you a recap of the past week’s top 10 events & stories.

PedSafe Headline of the Week:

Magnesium may be as important to kids’ bone health as calcium http://t.co/Ea5rKnE1Ov

Do toddlers really need to floss their teeth?

Do I really need flossYour 1-year-old may seem a little young for flossing, but cavities don’t know how old teeth are! Teeth can get cavities as soon as they erupt into the mouth. If your toddler’s teeth are touching one another, food and plaque can get stuck between them, and cavities can form.

The importance of flossing is one of the reasons that the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends taking your child for his first dental appointment at age 1. At this visit, the dentist can help determine if your child’s teeth are ready to be flossed, and she’ll show you how to properly brush and floss them. (This will be your job for a long time; most children aren’t ready to brush and floss on their own until they are 8 or 10 years old.)

Nighttime brushing and flossing are the most important, so make sure you do it every night before bed. And remember: Nothing to eat or drink except plain water after you’re finished!



Child Health & Safety News Roundup: 04-29-2013 to 05-05-2013

twitter thumbWelcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world.

Each day we use Twitter to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and other caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we may miss something, but we think overall we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. But for our friends and colleagues who are not on Twitter (or who are but may have missed something), we offer you a recap of the past week’s top 25 events & stories.

PedSafe Headline of the Week:

The Right Amount Of Vitamin D For Babies – interesting new study http://t.co/YXKEtHHVdF