Child Health & Safety News Roundup: 03-04-2013 to 03-10-2013

twitter thumbWelcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world.

Each day we use Twitter to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and other caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we may miss something, but we think overall we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. But for our friends and colleagues who are not on Twitter (or who are but may have missed something), we offer you a recap of the past week’s top 15 events & stories.

PedSafe Headline of the Week:

Can food allergies be prevented? | Confessions of a Dr. Mom http://t.co/XAaLuy2qhI

Is Your Baby Sleeping Safely?

On her back - no bumpersWhen it comes to taking care of your newborn, most things are instinctual. Feed, burp, change diapers and, of course, put the baby down for naps. Lots of them. But what may seem like a no-brainer — your baby sleeping in her crib — actually requires some forethought and safety education.

“There’s a short list of things all new parents should know,” says Michael Goodstein, M.D., F.A.A.P., attending neonatologist at York Hospital in York, Penn., and member of the American Academy of Pediatrics SIDS task force. At the top of that list: “Babies should be put on their backs to sleep to help reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome.” SIDS is the leading cause of death in children younger than the age of 1; it’s most common in infants between 2 and 4 months of age.

Goodstein also recommends the following baby sleeping practices, endorsed by the AAP:

  • Place baby to sleep on her back on a firm, solid surface such as a crib mattress or play yard mat with a well-fitting sheet.
  • Avoid the use of pillows, loose bedding (blankets and sheets), crib bumpers, sleep positioners and stuffed animals for the first year of life.
  • Place the baby’s crib or bassinet in your bedroom within arm’s reach of your bed. Co-sleeping with your baby in your bed is not recommended. “Babies can be brought into bed for cuddling and feeding, but not sleep time,” says Goodstein.
  • Baby should always sleep in a smoke-free environment.
  • Do not place blankets or sheets over baby’s head, and do not over-bundle her with bedding or clothing. Overheating can be dangerous; signs include flushed cheeks, sweating, damp hair and rapid breathing. Make sure the room temperature is comfortable for a lightly dressed adult.
  • Give your baby tummy time while she’s awake.

When it’s time to register for your baby shower or when you’re out shopping for the nursery, remember to choose goods that help facilitate safe sleep practices. A few of my favorite baby sleeping products:

  1. Skip Hop Complete Sheet Bumper-Free Bedding comes in adorable patterns and gives you the style of a crib bumper without having to use one. Brilliant. (Bonus: A wearable blanket is included in the set!) $120/4-piece set
  2. Halo 100 Percent Organic Cotton SleepSack Swaddle makes swaddling simple and gives you the option of keeping arms in or out. $35 each
  3. Arm’s Reach Co-Sleepers are bassinets with a unique feature: an open side and fastening system that lets you secure it to the side of your bed. Many styles are available; the Mini is perfect for travel. $139 and up
  4. Naturepedic No-Compromise Organic Cotton Lightweight Baby Crib & Toddler Mattress features hypoallergenic fabric and a waterproof surface. But best of all, it eliminates concerns over toxic fire-retardant chemicals by providing naturally derived fire resistance made from cellulose, baking soda and hydrated silica. $259



Child Health & Safety News Roundup: 02-25-2013 to 03-03-2013

twitter thumbWelcome to Pediatric Safety’s weekly “Child Health & Safety News Roundup”- a recap of the past week’s child health and safety news headlines from around the world.

Each day we use Twitter to communicate relevant and timely health and safety information to the parents, medical professionals and other caregivers who follow us. Occasionally we may miss something, but we think overall we’re doing a pretty good job of keeping you informed. But for our friends and colleagues who are not on Twitter (or who are but may have missed something), we offer you a recap of the past week’s top 15 events & stories.

PedSafe Headline of the Week:

Chuck E. Cheese adds Gluten-Free Menu Choices: Now kids on special diets can play too… http://t.co/6PB6VLWV32

Hidden Dangers in Your Baby’s Nursery

Via Column Five for Healthy Child

Chuck E. Cheese adds Gluten-Free Menu Choices

Now children on special diets can enjoy new items during a trip to the overly stimulating kiddie casino called Chuck E. Cheese’s. In addition to the rides, climbing tunnels and arcade games there is now an individual sized gluten-free cheese pizza and a gluten-free chocolate cupcake on the menu at over 500 locations in the United States and Canada.

Here are some of the key FAQ about the new Chuck E. Cheese Gluten-Free Menu:

How many Chuck E. Cheese’s locations offer a gluten-free menu?

The gluten-free menu is available at more than 500 Chuck E. Cheese’s locations beginning Nov. 13.

How can I find out if my local Chuck E. Cheese’s offers the gluten-free menu?

Guests can inquire about their local restaurant’s gluten-free menu by contacting guest relations at 1-888-778-7193.

How much will the gluten-free menu items cost?

Chuck E. Cheese’s personal-size gluten-free pizza costs $5.99 at most locations in the U.S. The chocolate cupcake costs $2.99 in the U.S. or C$3.49 in Canada. Prices may vary slightly at some locations.

What makes Chuck E. Cheese’s gluten-free pizza different from other chains offering gluten-free pizza?

Chuck E. Cheese’s utilizes an innovative and unique process from kitchen to table that reduces the gluten-free pizza’s chances of encountering any sort of particle that might cross-contaminate the product and make it unsafe for a guest with strict gluten intolerance. Additionally, Chuck E. Cheese’s gluten-free cheese pizza is sold for the same price as its personal-size pizza with traditional crust.

How does the gluten-free pizza get from the kitchen to the guest’s table?

The gluten-free pizza arrives at Chuck E. Cheese’s locations from Conte’s Pasta’s dedicated, certified gluten-free facilities in frozen, pre-sealed packaging. The bake-in-bag pizza remains sealed while cooked and delivered, until it is opened and served with a personal pizza cutter at families’ tables by the adult in charge.

Under the same procedure, gluten-free chocolate fudge cupcakes from Fabe’s All Natural Bakery will remain in pre-sealed, single-serve packaging through preparation until opened and served at the table.

Chuck E Cheese - fun

Are Chuck E. Cheese’s gluten-free menu options appropriate for children and adults with celiac disease?

Yes, Chuck E. Cheese’s gluten-free menu items are manufactured in dedicated gluten-free certified facilities and kept sealed from delivery to kitchen to table to prevent possible cross-contamination from outside particles.

For additional FAQ and information on Chuck E. Cheese’s new Gluten-Free Menu, click here.

To read more on Gluten-Free, click here.